Changing Colors: The Blog of Spectrum Pediatrics

Posts Tagged ‘responsive feeding’

August 6, 2018

Responsive Feeding: Reflection Time

By: Heidi Moreland, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, CLC

It often seems easier to find exact guidelines on how to help your child. Responsive feeding is a great structure, but it can feel like there are a lot of gray areas when it comes to application.

Picture helping your child learn to walk. In the beginning you hold them upright, and even help them move their feet! As they mature in their skills, you progress to holding two hands, holding one hand or, just using a finger. Eventually, you let them walk to your outstretched hands and you catch them if they wobble. Sometimes you need to let them fall in order to allow them to develop their balance independently. Once they are running on the playground by themselves, you will probably forget all of the months of practice and many steps that you went through!

You can apply the same idea to other skills. We created some questions to ask yourself to guide you through the gray areas of the mealtime relationships:


Enjoyment

  1. What does my child think about food (or drinking) right now? How do they communicate this?
  2. What does my child think about family mealtimes right now? How do they communicate this?
  3. Is his or her response to mealtimes different than other areas of structure? (For example, 2 year olds often do not like to be confined, and would rather explore than eat. This does not necessarily mean that he doesn’t like food, but may dislike sitting for more than a few minutes.)

Abilities

  1.  What do they do at about 80% of mealtimes with ____________ ? No one is 100% at anything, especially toddlers and preschoolers, so 80% is a good measure of mastery. This can be any skill, such as drinking from a cup, sitting at the table, using a spoon, or just taking bites without spitting them out. It can also be behaviors, manners, and food challenges like sitting at the table or tasting new foods.
  2. What do I hope they will do at mealtimes?

Shaping rules and expectations

  1. If you do an assessment of their enjoyment and find that there is no enjoyment at all, you may need to back up your expectations until they are more relaxed at mealtimes.
  2. Once you have some enjoyment of food and mealtimes, you can begin adding structure a little bit at a time.

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August 6, 2018

Responsive Parenting: Why is this important for mealtimes?

By: Heidi Moreland, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, CLC

Every parent has a parenting style which is formed by their own personality, the way their own parents interacted with them, the community in which they live, and how the child’s personality responds and interacts to that style. Their interactions are characterized in part by how they respond to their kids and their views on how to set limits, with some parents leaning more towards being more permissive, others towards being more authoritarian. The truth is that both responsiveness and limits are important.

Responsive Parenting: This includes a balance between being the authority, while still recognizing their children’s cues and responding positively to them. Parents acknowledge the child’s needs and desires, and may provide developmentally appropriate reasons for the rules, but have high expectations for their kids and expect that rules will be followed.

This role evolves over time. When children are infants, the parents’ primary job is to notice the child’s needs by responding promptly. However, in order to mature past the demanding nature of infancy, children need to develop the ability to safely and successfully interact with a changing world independently. This means that parents can’t just respond to the child’s needs and expect them to mature, they must also teach their child to cope with stress and novelty (Landry, Smith, and Swank, 2006) by allowing them opportunities to be independent, even if they struggle a little. This should look different for each child and family, and your expectations should change over time as your child matures, but it will continue to follow the same process.

This style of parenting seems to work well for developing healthy eaters. Most research that looks at parenting style and eating finds that kids of responsive (authoritative) parents are more likely to develop self-regulation, be less picky, and have less food battles than parents of authoritarian or permissive styles.

Sources:

Darling, N., & Steinberg, L. (1993). Parenting style as context: An integrative model. Psychological bulletin, 113(3), 487.

Hughes, S. O., Power, T. G., Fisher, J. O., Mueller, S., & Nicklas, T. A. (2005). Revisiting a neglected construct: parenting styles in a child-feeding context.Appetite, 44(1), 83-92.

Landry, S. H., Smith, K. E., & Swank, P. R. (2006). Responsive parenting: establishing early foundations for social, communication, and independent problem-solving skills. Developmental psychology, 42(4), 627.

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