Changing Colors: The Blog of Spectrum Pediatrics

Archive for the ‘Speech Therapy’ Category

March 27, 2017

Everything Sprouts in Spring: Yoga

By: Krystina Burke, MS, CCC-SLP

The spring season is a great time to get outside and get moving as a family! As we have mentioned here before at Spectrum, yoga is a fun activity that children of all ages and their parents can do together! We all know yoga is great for the body and mind but did you know yoga can benefit and boost the language skills of little ones, too? Yoga poses rely on the skills of physical imitation and attention which are foundational language skills. In addition, doing springtime yoga poses as a family can also secretly target higher language skills such as spatial relationships and opposites for the older children in your family!

Children ages 4-5 are beginning to understand words for order such as “first, next, and last” and can follow longer directions containing multiple steps more easily! Opposites like up and down and big and little also start to have meaning and can be used to further clarify a child’s message.

Yoga poses are often taught using step-by-step instructions in combination with physical modeling. This is a perfect and natural place to add order words! Some of my favorite springtime poses are tree pose, sun, bird, and planting a garden. Here is one way to teach tree pose to the little ones in your life: “First, stand on one leg, then bend your opposite knee, next place the bottom of your foot on your inner ankle or thigh (depending on the comfort and balance of the child) lastly, balance and sway in the wind like a tree”.

You can make this more challenging by asking children to be big or little trees or have their trees move up and down in the wind! Once you feel like your child has mastered a pose, have them try and “teach” the pose to someone else. Now they have the opportunity to use order words and opposites to explain a more complex direction to someone else!

Check out some more springtime yoga poses here!

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March 21, 2017

Trick of the Trade from Jamie Hinchey, MS, CCC-SLP

Welcome Spring: Picture It!

Now that it’s spring, it’s time to get outside and enjoy the nice weather! As a speech therapist I am always looking for fun and creative crafts to do during my therapy sessions. I love when the seasons start to change, especially from winter to spring. This is a great time to work on sequencing and concepts during my therapy sessions. This “Picture It” craft uses a trick of the trade we have talked about previously: cameras.

For this activity you will need:

  • A camera (on phone or your “old school” camera)
  • Colored pencils or crayons
  • A large piece of white construction paper

With spring, usually comes beautiful days outside. Before going outside, it is helpful to talk to your child about the different seasons and explain now that winter is going away, spring will be next. By using these sequence words (first, next, then, etc.) you can work on time concepts with your child. It may be helpful to talk about what spring means and what you might start to see outside as the seasons change. A book can also be a great way to introduce new concepts, there are a lot of books focusing on spring or outdoor activities. See our previous post on spring books here!

Once you have gone over this with your child, take them outside and take a picture of them in the environment. This could be in the flowers, under a tree, laying on the grass, or at the playground. If possible, print out your picture and use it when you start your “Picture It” craft. If you are unable to print it out, have the picture out so your child can reference this. Ask your child to identify what they see in the picture and draw their own picture of what “spring” looks like to them. To challenge your child, you could also talk about what you might hear or taste on a nice day! This craft can target all areas of development. For fine motor skills, have your child draw with different types of writing utensils or even cut out pieces of paper and glue. For gross motor and attention, work on your child sitting in a specific spot at the table or floor and attending enough to complete the activity. For language development, have your child tell you about what they did outside or retell what happened in a book you may have read about Spring! There are so many fun crafts, but try to use the beautiful Spring weather as a way to get your child outside!

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March 21, 2017

Everything Sprouts in Spring: What makes a good book?

By: Brianna Craite, MS, CCC-SLP

Recently, the therapists at Spectrum Pediatrics had a discussion on “What makes a good book?” We know how important book routines are to develop strong early literacy and pre-reading skills. Books can also help foster hand eye coordination while turning pages. You can practice supported or independent sitting while reading.

Walking into the book section in any store or browsing the library can be overwhelming with the wide selection. Here are a few things our therapists’ thought of especially when looking at the pictures that may ease your search:

  • Bright simple pictures
  • Pictures that include early vocabulary themes like body parts, animals, toys etc.
  • Pictures “tell the story”

As children get older we suggest books with words or phrases that repeat to practice early literacy skills. Check out the list below and you’ll see some of my book choices for the upcoming spring season!

Toddler

Board books are easy for early readers to turn the pages. It is important to look for interactive flaps, bright colors, and spring vocabulary. As a speech therapist, I often recommend that parents label the pictures they see in the book while allowing their child to explore the interactive parts of the book. Using books with interactive flaps can help increase your child’s attention on the book.

Preschool/Kindergarten

While looking for books for preschool age, focus on books that have repetitive words such as I see Spring. The repetitive words are great for early readers. The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle is one of my favorite books for Spring. After reading this book, try planting seeds of your own for an interactive activity to go along with the story! And Then it’s Spring by Julie Fogliano is a great book for early readers, especially when focusing on teaching the concept of changing seasons. Spring is Here by Will Hillenbrand is a wonderful book for introducing spring vocabulary and learning about friendship!

Enjoy your books!

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March 8, 2017

Technology Tuesday: BabySee App

Have you ever wondered what your baby can see when they are born? We know that a child’s vision starts to develop from the moment they are born. Scientists and researchers have been studying how the brain and eyes develop to learn how babies can see clarity, color, and contrast. This app was created by REBIScan and Boston Children’s Hospital’s Chief of Ophthalmology, David G. Hunter, MD, PhD to create this vision stimulator. The BabySee app allows parents to see what their child would see as they develop.

The BabySee app uses video imaging to stimulate how a child would see at any given age, focusing on clarity, color, and contrast. To use this app you can use the camera on your mobile device, then touch and hold the screen to compare the “infant” vision with the normal adult vision. You can input your child’s birthdate for accurate age levels to show vision at different ages. Some fun features of the app include being able to share favorite images with family members through email or text, saving images to an album, and the ability to explore different scientific articles to learn more about infant vision!

A tip for parents with premature babies: Make sure to put in your child’s due date so you see through the lense of their adjusted age! To purchase the app click here!

March 6, 2017

Trick of the Trade from Tracy Magee, MS, CCC-SLP

Blankets

This object is in everyone’s house, but it is not usually considered a great tool for learning – a blanket! Surprisingly, this item can provide lots of opportunities for language and movement. Here are a few ways we use a blanket at Spectrum Pediatrics:

1. Regulation – We all have our own unique ways to help ourselves cope with the sensory information that we are receiving in our daily lives. Swinging in a blanket is a great way to help calm a child that might be overwhelmed. The blanket creates a safe cocoon and the linear movement is very beneficial in helping a child overcome too much sensory input.

2. Movement – Kids can make the blanket into a parachute-type game with holding the corners and moving it up and down. Kids can have the blanket “pop” balls out the top or kids can go under the blanket when it rises up.

3. Language – A blanket can provide hours of entertainment for receptive (listening/comprehension) and expressive (speaking) language.

  • Receptive: Practice prepositions with a doll or other object. For example, “Hide the dog under to blanket, Put the doll on top of the blanket.” You can also work on following directions to play the parachute game (“Make the blanket go UP! Make the blanket go DOWN!”)
  • Expressive: Have your child hop on the blanket for a ride, and he/she must tell you where to go. (“Take a right, Go left, Take me to the kitchen!”) Try to work on the concepts of “fast” and “slow” while going for a ride.

These ideas are just the beginning! Talk to your therapist about other ways to use this simple object to create some wonderful learning opportunities!

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February 22, 2017

Tips for Improving Your Child’s Communication

At Spectrum Pediatrics, we often find ourselves talking to parents about small changes they can make during their daily routines to help build their child’s communication skills. Two of our speech therapists are sharing four of their all-time favorite tips for parents. Check out the video below to hear Jamie and Krystina discuss these tips and explain what makes them so important and how to build them into your everyday routine!

Stay posted for more helpful videos on tummy time and feeding behaviors at mealtimes!

February 21, 2017

Screen Time: What are the new guidelines?

By: Tracy Magee, MS, CCC-SLP

Recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) released new guidelines on their website regarding screen time and young children. Previously, it was suggested that children should not be exposed to any type of screen – TV, smart phone, or tablet – until a child was at least 2 years of age. Nevertheless, with technology becoming more and more a part of our daily lives, it is almost impossible to completely avoid screens until a child is 2 years old. Here are some highlights from the newly released guidelines…

1. It is best to continue to limit screen exposure for all kids under 18 months. There is one exception – video chat. Feel free to let your little one interact with Grandma and Grandpa each day! Research shows that babies may not be able to participate in the conversational part of a video chat, but they will be able to benefit from playing peek-a-boo with their relative on the screen.

2. With children from 15 months to 2 years old, it is best to sit and watch an educational program with them. It has been found that a child can actually learn some new vocabulary if the parent is participating in watching the program and talking about it.

3. Children between ages 2 and 5 are able to process at least some of the information that is shown in a television program, yet of course, the screen time should still be kept in moderation. Programs and apps developed by the Sesame Street Workshop and PBS have the most research to prove their highly educational value.

Despite these new educational videos and apps, it is important to remember that kids learn best through human interaction! Keep playing and talking with your child each day!

The organization, Common Sense Media, provides great guidance to parents about age-appropriate television, movies, and smart phone apps. You can access information from them at this website or download their free app here!

 

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February 14, 2017

Cup Drinking: Where to start?

By: Jamie Hinchey, MS, CCC-SLP

As a feeding therapist, I often have parents ask me about where to go next when transitioning to a cup. Finding the appropriate cup for your child can be a difficult task. Although there are a variety of sippy cups on the market today, the most important transition for your child is eventually to either an open cup or a straw cup. If your child has a specific reason for a certain cup, your feeding therapist will help you with this transition. We often recommend practicing with open cup drinking or a straw cup once your child is around 6 months old or sitting independently. This depends on where your child is developmentally and it is important to keep in mind if your baby has any difficulty with swallowing. Although these two versions of drinking may be a little messier than the sippy cup, try practicing outside or in an easy-to-clean environment so that your child can learn.

Many parents view sippy cups as a developmental milestone, but drinking from a sippy cup is not a specific milestone a child must reach. When focusing on the developmental milestones, we look at a child’s ability to transition from the breast or a bottle to an open cup or straw drinking. As a child’s oral motor skills develop, they gain more control over their lips, tongue, and swallow. As feeding therapists, we notice that children are typically most interested in the cups they see their caregivers use. At around 9 months, your child may be able to start to drink from a straw or at least start to practice. There are certain cups that can be helpful when “teaching” straw drinking, although many kids learn through practice as their oral motor skills develop. We would not expect your child to be able to pick up an open cup without assistance and drink from it, there are a few great transition open cups that we often recommend to families.

Here are a few tips when looking for a cup for your child:

Handles: Handles are important when introducing a new cup since this allows your child to easily grasp onto the cup and start to learn how to independently bring the cup towards their mouth. When a cup is hard to hold, it is difficult for a child to focus on holding the cup, bringing it to their mouth, and learning how to drink from the cup.

Focus on the “top” of the cup: The transition open cup allows for the child to learn the motor pattern of drinking from an open cup. We often recommend the Miracle 360 cup for a transitional open cup. Since the top of the cup is mainly closed, the liquid comes out at a slower pace and allows the child to have better oral motor control. This cup has a lip on the top where your child learns how to position their top and bottom lip while drinking. There are also straw cups that have “weighted” straws, which means that the straws hold liquid even when the cup is tipped up, allowing the child to be successful even if they attempt to tip the cup up. Parents have recommended the Zoli cup for a first weighted straw cup.

Allow your child to explore: It is important when introducing a new cup that you give your child the time they may need to explore the cup. This means that when you are first starting, take the time to put the cup out while your child is playing with their toys. Although they may not drink from the cup yet, they will become comfortable with how to hold the cup and bringing it to their mouth. Your child will learn best from what they see you do, therefore mealtimes are a GREAT time to model drinking from either a straw or an open cup!

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February 6, 2017

Trick of the Trade from Tracy Magee, MS, CCC-SLP

Yoga

Lately, I have been doing yoga with many of my clients, and I have found that it has many benefits for speech and language. Here are a few reasons you should try with your kids today!

1. Attention and Imitation – These skills are necessary to develop verbal speech skills. A child needs to be able to look at someone and copy movements in order to copy lip movements and words.

2. Comprehension – A child must focus on the verbal instructions being given to follow along with the yoga “flow” and assume the correct positioning. This skill helps with processing language and learning new words.

3. Breath Control – Yoga focuses on breath. The deep breaths in and out that are required help a child learn how to control his/her breathing. This is important for controlling breath when producing sounds, too. Deep breaths are also a great way to help kids learn how to stay calm and “regulate” their bodies and emotions.

Some yoga resources that are great for kids are:

  • GoNoodle – available for FREE on their website or on the AppleTV app
  • Yoga Kids by Kirsten Hall
  • Once Upon a Mat… Starring Jessie Forston
  • The Kids’ Yoga Deck: 50 Poses and Games by Annie Buckley

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January 17, 2017

Trick of the Trade from Jamie Hinchey, MS, CCC-SLP

Videos

As a speech therapist I am often working on articulation or development of speech sounds with children between the ages of 5-8. After this holiday season, I noticed that so many of the children I see received some form of technology for Christmas, whether it was an iPad or a different type of tablet. Although it is important to set boundaries on the amount of technology your child uses, it actually can be helpful when working on articulation and home practice. This provides a motivating and fun way for children to want to participate in articulation therapy, which is not always the most fun.

Lately, I have started to use the video or camera feature on the tablet to have the child record how they are producing the sounds. This provides the opportunity for the parents to see how therapy is going if they are unable to be home. It also gives the child a chance to see how they produce each sound and “rate” their sounds. If a child is able to hear the difference in their sound production it often helps them to fix their errors and accurately produce the sound. Another way to have this video feature used in therapy is to record activities so the child can continue to practice throughout the week. The most important part of articulation therapy is the carryover while at home.

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