Changing Colors: The Blog of Spectrum Pediatrics

Archive for the ‘Preschool’ Category

June 14, 2017

Ways to Beat the Heat

By: Krystina Burke, MS, CCC-SLP

Summer is here! It’s time to pull out the sprinkler, put on the sun screen, and enjoy time in the hot sun with your little ones! Achieving proper hydration is always important for young children, especially during hot summer months! When it is hot out, it is important to have your child drink more often throughout the day. If you know your child is going to be outside in the sun for a an extended period of time or will be participating in physical activities, offer them extra fluids beforehand to drink. In addition, it is recommended that children take a break about every 20 minutes during increased physical activity to hydrate.

If a child does not drink enough liquids, they may become dehydrated. Some signs of dehydration include: dry mouth, few or no tears, less wet diapers or decreased urination, a darkening in urination color, and drowsiness. It is important to contact your medical team if you become concerned regarding your child’s hydration level or state.

In addition to offering fluids before outdoor activities and taking frequent drinking breaks, incorporating liquid filled summer snacks and treats is a great way to increase hydration levels in small children during hot months. Fruits like watermelon, melons, and peaches are full of liquids and can be a great choice for a sweet refreshing snack. You may also try blending your favorite fruits, frozen fruits, ice, and water and freezing this mixture in popsicle molds for a cold and healthy summertime treat!

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April 24, 2017

Exact Instructions Challenge

By: Tracy Magee, M.Ed, CCC-SLP

I recently saw this video on social media, and it really spoke to my “SLP” heart! We don’t often think about how we use language and the importance of the words we use. This dad created a fun game for his kids to practice sequencing, using concept words, like “First, Then, in, on top of,” etc. Watch the video to see how these kids learn the importance of the vocabulary that they use.

You can do this in your own house with your kids to work on prepositions (in, on top, next to, under), time words (First, Then, Last), and other descriptors (color words, long/short, big/small, etc.). Here are some ideas to practice sequencing in your home with this family challenge!

1. How to tie your shoes

2. How to ride a bike/scooter

3. How to put on your jacket

 

April 6, 2017

Spring Time Activities

By: Tracy Magee, MS, CCC-SLP

Spring is a wonderful time to be in the Washington, DC area! There is so much to do and many of the activities are free! Here are just a few ideas for what to do to celebrate the arrival of Spring!

1. Cherry Blossom Festival

  • The cherry blossom trees are one of the major attractions for visitors in the springtime.
  • It can get busy, particularly on weekends. This website lists some great tips for seeing the flowers with little ones in tow!
  • Besides seeing the flowers, there are festival activities each weekend that are very family-friendly. My personal favorite is the Kite Festival, but this website discusses so many more!

2. Thomas the Tank Engine

  • Thomas the Tank Engine is coming to Baltimore!
  • Kids are able to take a short ride on the actual train and meet some of their favorite characters, including Sir Topham Hatt! See this website for more information and ticket availability!

3. Great Playgrounds

  • There are tons of wonderful parks and playground in the DMV area, and now is the time to use them with the warmer weather! Here are a few of a my favorites:
  • Clemyjontri Park – This park in McLean has a great motto – “every child can play!” It was created to make sure that all kids are included, so it boasts some great perks such as ramps, wheelchair access, and other things for kids with sensory needs. It’s wonderful!
  • Chessie’s Big Backyard – This awesome playground in Alexandria has two areas – one for the the little kids and one for the bigger kids. It’s sure to please your entire family and keep them playing and running for hours! It’s located next to the “Our Special Harbor Spray Park,” which is open during the summer months.
  • Cabin John Park: This park is located in Maryland. It is expansive with many different playgrounds scattered throughout the grounds. It has a train ride that runs throughout the park, and it entertains the entire family!

4. Rainy Day ideas

  • We all know that April showers bring May flowers, so here are a couple ideas for days when the weather is less than ideal.
  • Theater – There are tons of children theater shows in the area. Check out this website for dates and locations.
  • Indoor playgrounds – We are lucky to have lots of options for indoor play spaces in the area. See the links below for locations!
  • Nook
  • Alexandria Soft Playroom
  • Open Gym Playtime

Spring has sprung! Let’s have some fun!

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March 27, 2017

Everything Sprouts in Spring: Yoga

By: Krystina Burke, MS, CCC-SLP

The spring season is a great time to get outside and get moving as a family! As we have mentioned here before at Spectrum, yoga is a fun activity that children of all ages and their parents can do together! We all know yoga is great for the body and mind but did you know yoga can benefit and boost the language skills of little ones, too? Yoga poses rely on the skills of physical imitation and attention which are foundational language skills. In addition, doing springtime yoga poses as a family can also secretly target higher language skills such as spatial relationships and opposites for the older children in your family!

Children ages 4-5 are beginning to understand words for order such as “first, next, and last” and can follow longer directions containing multiple steps more easily! Opposites like up and down and big and little also start to have meaning and can be used to further clarify a child’s message.

Yoga poses are often taught using step-by-step instructions in combination with physical modeling. This is a perfect and natural place to add order words! Some of my favorite springtime poses are tree pose, sun, bird, and planting a garden. Here is one way to teach tree pose to the little ones in your life: “First, stand on one leg, then bend your opposite knee, next place the bottom of your foot on your inner ankle or thigh (depending on the comfort and balance of the child) lastly, balance and sway in the wind like a tree”.

You can make this more challenging by asking children to be big or little trees or have their trees move up and down in the wind! Once you feel like your child has mastered a pose, have them try and “teach” the pose to someone else. Now they have the opportunity to use order words and opposites to explain a more complex direction to someone else!

Check out some more springtime yoga poses here!

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March 21, 2017

Bike Riding 101

By Colleen Donley, PT, DPT

Here are a few tips to remember while picking out a bike:

  • Kid’s bike sizes are determined based on the wheel size, not the seat height- wheel sizes include 12, 16, 20, and 24-inches.
  • A child should be able to dismount and straddle the frame while standing flat-footed.
  • When riding, the knees should not be scrunched up under the handlebars or straight out at the lowest position. There should always be a slight bend in the knee.
  • There are different types of brakes- rear-coaster brakes and hand brakes

Before you get into the standard “big kid bike,” there are different styles to help get your child prepared. Here are some explanations of different styles to help you choose where to start and which is right for your child.

  • Pedal and push bikes let your child sit on the seat with their feet on or off the pedals while you push them along. As your child gets accustomed to the feel of movement on the seat and begins to push the pedals on their own, you can gradually fade out how much you push them along. Most of these bikes come with removable handles to convert into a toddler bike.
  • Tricycles have three wheels and serve as great starting points to help your little one develop the coordination to pedal. Moving the pedals requires moving the right and left leg in a reciprocal manner, a skill that many children actually have to learn! Kiddos steer tricycles by using the handlebars only and not by leaning their weight to one side or the other.
  • Balance bikes have no pedals. They let your child develop their sense of movement, momentum, and balance while learning how to steer without the added complexity of a pedal. Many like balance bikes as a first step as they allow the child to keep their feet on or close to the ground for extra stability while they learn to control their body on the bike.
  • Training wheels have become more of a contentious point as the popularity of balance bikes has grown. Training wheels widen the base of support in the back of the bike to eliminate the need for balance while your child masters the coordination of moving the pedals and steering. Many say that training wheels teach the child how to unbalance the bike, as the child will lean their weight against the outer support of the wheels. Then when the training wheels come off, the child has to unlearn to lean against this leverage. So for a child that has already mastered balance on a balance bike, it might be worth skipping the training wheels.

Before beginning to ride, don’t forget the helmet!! Be sure to get the right size by measuring the circumference of your child’s head one inch above the eyebrow. A properly fitting helmet should be placed on top of your child’s head and remain in place as they shake their head yes and no. Head out to an open parking lot or empty tennis court to give your kiddo lots of open space to explore and experiment with speed and steering. Have fun!

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March 21, 2017

Trick of the Trade from Jamie Hinchey, MS, CCC-SLP

Welcome Spring: Picture It!

Now that it’s spring, it’s time to get outside and enjoy the nice weather! As a speech therapist I am always looking for fun and creative crafts to do during my therapy sessions. I love when the seasons start to change, especially from winter to spring. This is a great time to work on sequencing and concepts during my therapy sessions. This “Picture It” craft uses a trick of the trade we have talked about previously: cameras.

For this activity you will need:

  • A camera (on phone or your “old school” camera)
  • Colored pencils or crayons
  • A large piece of white construction paper

With spring, usually comes beautiful days outside. Before going outside, it is helpful to talk to your child about the different seasons and explain now that winter is going away, spring will be next. By using these sequence words (first, next, then, etc.) you can work on time concepts with your child. It may be helpful to talk about what spring means and what you might start to see outside as the seasons change. A book can also be a great way to introduce new concepts, there are a lot of books focusing on spring or outdoor activities. See our previous post on spring books here!

Once you have gone over this with your child, take them outside and take a picture of them in the environment. This could be in the flowers, under a tree, laying on the grass, or at the playground. If possible, print out your picture and use it when you start your “Picture It” craft. If you are unable to print it out, have the picture out so your child can reference this. Ask your child to identify what they see in the picture and draw their own picture of what “spring” looks like to them. To challenge your child, you could also talk about what you might hear or taste on a nice day! This craft can target all areas of development. For fine motor skills, have your child draw with different types of writing utensils or even cut out pieces of paper and glue. For gross motor and attention, work on your child sitting in a specific spot at the table or floor and attending enough to complete the activity. For language development, have your child tell you about what they did outside or retell what happened in a book you may have read about Spring! There are so many fun crafts, but try to use the beautiful Spring weather as a way to get your child outside!

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March 21, 2017

Everything Sprouts in Spring: What makes a good book?

By: Brianna Craite, MS, CCC-SLP

Recently, the therapists at Spectrum Pediatrics had a discussion on “What makes a good book?” We know how important book routines are to develop strong early literacy and pre-reading skills. Books can also help foster hand eye coordination while turning pages. You can practice supported or independent sitting while reading.

Walking into the book section in any store or browsing the library can be overwhelming with the wide selection. Here are a few things our therapists’ thought of especially when looking at the pictures that may ease your search:

  • Bright simple pictures
  • Pictures that include early vocabulary themes like body parts, animals, toys etc.
  • Pictures “tell the story”

As children get older we suggest books with words or phrases that repeat to practice early literacy skills. Check out the list below and you’ll see some of my book choices for the upcoming spring season!

Toddler

Board books are easy for early readers to turn the pages. It is important to look for interactive flaps, bright colors, and spring vocabulary. As a speech therapist, I often recommend that parents label the pictures they see in the book while allowing their child to explore the interactive parts of the book. Using books with interactive flaps can help increase your child’s attention on the book.

Preschool/Kindergarten

While looking for books for preschool age, focus on books that have repetitive words such as I see Spring. The repetitive words are great for early readers. The Tiny Seed by Eric Carle is one of my favorite books for Spring. After reading this book, try planting seeds of your own for an interactive activity to go along with the story! And Then it’s Spring by Julie Fogliano is a great book for early readers, especially when focusing on teaching the concept of changing seasons. Spring is Here by Will Hillenbrand is a wonderful book for introducing spring vocabulary and learning about friendship!

Enjoy your books!

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March 15, 2017

Technology Tuesday: Hello Spring

We found an app that we had to include in our “Everything Sprouts in Spring” series! The “Hello Spring: Preschool Games” mobile application is available on both your phone or iPad. This app is a great way to “Welcome Spring” with your child. The free version of this application allows you to explore the different things you may see out in nature when spring arrives. This includes growing trees, blossoming flowers, and a rabbit that helps guide your child around the screen. By using your finger to point to different areas on the screen, your child can help the rabbit feed baby birds, give water to the flowers, and help dig with a shovel to grow food in the garden. This is specifically designed for preschool and kindergarten children. For $2.99 you can buy in-app purchases that allow your child to design different animals (bees, birds, etc.), learn about where fresh produce comes from, and take care of baby birds to help them grow.

To learn more about the app or to purchase it click here!

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March 6, 2017

Trick of the Trade from Tracy Magee, MS, CCC-SLP

Blankets

This object is in everyone’s house, but it is not usually considered a great tool for learning – a blanket! Surprisingly, this item can provide lots of opportunities for language and movement. Here are a few ways we use a blanket at Spectrum Pediatrics:

1. Regulation – We all have our own unique ways to help ourselves cope with the sensory information that we are receiving in our daily lives. Swinging in a blanket is a great way to help calm a child that might be overwhelmed. The blanket creates a safe cocoon and the linear movement is very beneficial in helping a child overcome too much sensory input.

2. Movement – Kids can make the blanket into a parachute-type game with holding the corners and moving it up and down. Kids can have the blanket “pop” balls out the top or kids can go under the blanket when it rises up.

3. Language – A blanket can provide hours of entertainment for receptive (listening/comprehension) and expressive (speaking) language.

  • Receptive: Practice prepositions with a doll or other object. For example, “Hide the dog under to blanket, Put the doll on top of the blanket.” You can also work on following directions to play the parachute game (“Make the blanket go UP! Make the blanket go DOWN!”)
  • Expressive: Have your child hop on the blanket for a ride, and he/she must tell you where to go. (“Take a right, Go left, Take me to the kitchen!”) Try to work on the concepts of “fast” and “slow” while going for a ride.

These ideas are just the beginning! Talk to your therapist about other ways to use this simple object to create some wonderful learning opportunities!

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February 22, 2017

Tips for Improving Your Child’s Communication

At Spectrum Pediatrics, we often find ourselves talking to parents about small changes they can make during their daily routines to help build their child’s communication skills. Two of our speech therapists are sharing four of their all-time favorite tips for parents. Check out the video below to hear Jamie and Krystina discuss these tips and explain what makes them so important and how to build them into your everyday routine!

Stay posted for more helpful videos on tummy time and feeding behaviors at mealtimes!